Browse Items (2273 total)

In the 1890s, members of Missoula’s genteel middle class had a problem. While they welcomed the business opportunities brought by the Northern Pacific Railroad, they feared the “unsavory” characters and “seedy” nightlife that accompanied…

This very early Westside home was the first on the block, built during the year Montana achieved statehood in 1889. Its anonymous builder, using locally manufactured brick, constructed the solid walls with three layers of masonry. The front porch…

Frank H. Cooney, one of four brothers in the merchandising business in Butte, purchased this lot on the William Penn Quartz Lode for $30 in 1898. As was usual in early Butte real estate deals, the mining company retained ownership of the property…

The stone foundation and masonry fabric of this early 1880s commercial building reflect the change to fireproof building materials after 1879, when a catastrophic fire destroyed most of Main Street. In 1884, the two-story building, like many of its…

A private ground-floor residence with rooms for rent upstairs was the original function of this 1880s two-story building. Its history provides a fascinating glimpse of life in early-day Butte. Maps of 1888 and 1890 show that a frame open-air porch…

Mature landscaping surrounds this cozy cottage bungalow built circa 1915. Colin L. Christie and his wife Ruth built the home where they raised two sons. Ruth was the daughter of Judge John Lindsay, who came to Butte in 1895 as secretary and legal…

A row of one-story frame shops including a harness maker, two carpenters, a cobbler, a saloon, a bakery, and a millinery filled this block in the 1880s. By 1890, most had been replaced. The present two-story storefront and lodging house replaced a…

Advertised as “The Choice Residence Section of Missoula,” the Hammond Addition attracted successful businessmen like David J. Haviland, who could afford the exclusivity the neighborhood offered. Lots in the Hammond Addition cost $500, as compared…

In 1880, when Joseph Broughton arrived in Walkerville, the booming silver town was a relatively isolated settlement. The Walker brothers—for whom the town is named—had purchased the Alice Mine only four years earlier with the help of their agent,…

Outlying settlements like Centerville sprang up so that miners could live near their work. Perched on the slope, Centerville’s steep streets witnessed many a wild winter bobsled ride down the long hill. A clanging bell cleared the way of…

In September 1887, the Helena Weekly Herald noted "nine first-class brick residences" under construction on South Rodney Street. Among them were three nearly identical duplexes, called Galen Estates after one of the development's principal investors.…

Bozeman’s premier architect Fred Willson designed this double storefront building with three apartments upstairs in 1928. Known for his versatility and customer-pleasing plans, Willson worked on other downtown projects that year as well, including…

r0000030.jpg
1883 perspective map of Deer Lodge, Montana. Includes numbered references. Not drawn to scale.

2006-38-31.jpg
Cartoonish depiction of a long-horn bull chasing a man up onto a fence. The bull is branded "2 Lazy-2 P."

Tags: ,

A small L-shaped dwelling with a full-length front porch stood on this lot by 1875 according to an early bird's-eye map of Helena. German Catholic rancher Herman Rosenbaum and his wife Mary purchased the house in 1879. The neighborhood was perfect…

High maintenance steam engines required railroads to locate large repair shops every two hundred miles. After the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad chose Miles City for a division point in 1907, the town grew rapidly. Population…

An early one-story wooden dwelling stood here by 1884, replaced by 1888 with a two-story brick residence, set slightly back from the street. The home soon found itself ensconced in a busy commercial district. Neighbors included saloons, grocery…

Neoclassical design elements define this substantial two-story brick home built in 1891. Dentils ornament the eaveline, multi-pane windows dominate the symmetrical front façade, and doubled columns provide support for what was once a full-length…

An 1889 map shows this single-story balloon-frame residence, home to dentist John McComb and his wife Mildred by 1900. The house was a short walk from McComb’s office at 116 West Main, and he remained in the neighborhood when he moved around the…

When John Harrington sold this lot in 1888, he reserved the right to mine within twenty feet of the surface—without reinforcing his mine with timbers. Understandably, the purchasers, miner Con Ambrose and his wife Sarah, built a functional,…

Built before 1889, this one-story residence predates the city water system’s arrival to the neighborhood two years later. A bay window and an open front porch (now enclosed) distinguished the gable front-and-wing house, which became home in 1900 to…

Gold drew not only miners to the camp at Last Chance Gulch, but also tradesmen and merchants such as George Doan, a mechanic from New York. Doan’s modest home, constructed circa 1865 as a temporary two-room dwelling of vertical board, well…

A two-story wooden residence sat at the rear of this lot, adjoining the alley, in 1889. A year later, owners built this remarkably well-preserved house on Lamme. Distinguishing the brick home are an inviting front porch, tall chimney, decorative…

In 1891, only eight years after Livingston's founding, Julia Rolfson and her husband John, a stone mason, lived in this substantial, brick, cross-gable home. The Italianate style inspired the one-and-one-half-story residence's wide, overhanging…

An 1884 map shows a wooden block with a trio of businesses here: a saloon, variety theatre, and fruit market. By 1912, the building housed a secondhand store. Sometime before 1927, the old wooden block was torn down, replaced by this one-story brick…
Output Formats

atom, csv, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-json, omeka-xml, rss2