Browse Items (1947 total)

The Classical Revival style is grandly expressed in this exemplary residence of high-fired tan brick, built between 1916 and 1920. A symmetrical façade with central porch, double entry doors, square brick columns, and a central gable over an…

E. H. Johnson, state legislator and Miles City’s first mayor, built this impressive modified Queen Anne style home in 1887. Attributed to Miles City architect Byron Vreeland, the irregular plan originally featured an elaborate arched porch and an…

Prominent contractor Charles Doenges built this delightful Bungalow style dwelling in 1922 during a housing shortage related to the building of Thompson Falls’ hydroelectric dam. The home was one of several rental properties built and maintained by…

Expansion of the railroad after the turn of the twentieth century brought many new residents to Urlin’s Addition on Missoula’s Northside. Rental housing such as this one-story Pyramid Cottage style residence, constructed circa 1907 and originally…

Deed records indicate that a Knights of Labor Hall stood here by 1887. Open to both skilled and unskilled workers, the Knights helped found the 1886 Silver Bow Trades and Labor Assembly. The influential organization advocated for an eight-hour day;…

Local physician Dr. Samuel Souders owned this commercial lot in 1909, when Dan Davis, an advocate for the construction of a fancy opera house, proposed it for the construction of his vision. The newspapers reported weekly for several months on…

William and Ellen Burt owned this L-shaped residence free and clear in 1920, but not the ground upon which it sat. As with many Centerville homes, the Anaconda Company kept ownership of the land, retaining the right to extract or explore for ore…

Contractor John Holm constructed this small two-story building for the Dion family in 1929 after he had remodeled the Dion Block on one side and built the J.C. Penney Building on the other. This final addition to the five-building Dion Block shares…

A gable-topped polygonal bay and small porch add charm to this brick hip-roofed cottage. Built in 1912, it was home to English (undoubtedly Cornish) miner Edward Dower and his wife Clara in the 1910s. The Gilmore family occupied the house by 1923,…

The Empire Land Company constructed many of Judith Place’s most fashionable residences, including this one-and-one-half-story Craftsman style home circa 1914. Reflecting the Progressive Era’s emphasis on efficiency, the company adopted the…

When this critical link between Great Falls and Black Eagle opened in December of 1920, the Great Falls Tribune described the Tenth Street Bridge as “a carved monument above the water.” Reflecting the pride and optimism of the community and the…

Built in the shadow of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company’s sprawling Original and Gagnon mines, boarding houses and apartments once crowded along this block. The Scandinavian Methodist Episcopal Church occupied the second story of a rooming house…

The Shingle style was just past its prime when an unknown architect designed this stellar example in 1901. The style, a uniquely American adaptation of several architectural traditions, achieved its distinctive look by emphasizing an asymmetrical…

New York capitalist Leonard Lewisohn—a principal in both the Boston and Montana and the Butte and Boston mining companies—invested heavily in Butte even though he never lived here. Among his other business ventures, he and business partner Simon…

Platted by 1881, Nevada Street was part of the rare Butte neighborhood more oriented toward the railroad (which paralleled Front Street) than toward the mines. The bustling community was home to railroad and warehouse workers, as well as streetcar…

“Let us help you breathe the air of freedom by selling you a home on the monthly payment plan.” So advertised the Butte Land and Investment Company, which sold William and Louvia Rowe this lot in 1919. Home ownership offered the Rowes a piece of…

Norwegian-born carpenter Albert Broadland arrived in Butte in 1912. The prolific builder constructed nearly half the homes in the Rowe Addition on the Flats, the elegant Finlan Hotel, and many Craftsman style bungalows in Uptown. Built circa 1916,…

Craftsman style bungalows were phenomenally popular in the 1910s, nationally and in Butte. A low-pitched gable roof, open porch, exposed rafter tails, and decorative knee braces identify this well-preserved example of the style. Constructed between…

Irish immigrant Charles Jenks was the first resident of this elaborate Craftsman style bungalow. Jenks, his wife Lena, and their small daughter moved into the new residence in 1916. As a cashier at the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, Jenks was a…

Joseph Walker, president of the Alice Gold and Silver Mine, platted the streets near his mine to provide convenient housing for mine workers. However, when he sold the lots, he kept the mineral rights. By separating mineral rights from property…

Copper was a primary component in warships, ammunition casing, and tanks. No wonder Butte’s economy boomed during World War I. The city’s population more than doubled between 1910 and 1918, and real estate developers scrambled to meet the demand…

Well-known Butte realtor E. Sterrett Shields and his family were the longtime residents of this interesting home, built just after the turn of the twentieth century. Shields was secretary/treasurer of the Butte Land and Investment Company and a…

Hand-cut local sandstone showcases the fine craftsmanship of master stonemason Martin Rolfson, who built this Colonial Revival style home in 1900. A hipped roof with front-facing gable and off-center frame porch create balanced asymmetry, while a…

Local rancher Lee Degenhart financed the construction of this building in 1910. Fred Haverty, a contractor from Hall, Montana, who later ran a car dealership here in Philipsburg, was the builder. Design features include the original ornamental leaded…
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